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Didelphodon by Pristichampsus Didelphodon by Pristichampsus
As it turns out, Triebold paleontology has discovered an associated skeleton of Didelphodon, and has reconstructed it, Mike Triebold will participate in the formal description of the skeleton, which is good, as I always worry about commercially collected fossils never being described.

Anyhow, so it turns out that didelphodon was most likely a semi-aquatic mollusk-eater, like an otter, this is what the skeleton seems to suggest. The skull and teeth are large and robust, for crushing, and the body seems equal parts opossum and otter.
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:iconpaleo-beast-emperor:
Paleo-Beast-Emperor Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Didelphodon was more like an otter? Who knew?
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2014  Professional General Artist
hmmm
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:iconpaleo-beast-emperor:
Paleo-Beast-Emperor Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
What you mean?
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:iconparaceratherium:
Paraceratherium Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012
At any given time there was probably many more species of mammals than dinosaurs. There are limited number of species in a genus of large-bodied megafauna whereas smaller animals tend to be more "speciose".

Unfortunately, smaller animals are more delicate and we have mostly incomplete specimens. Paleontology of Mesozoic mammals will be a growing field and will help fill out the ecological profile of the era.
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012  Professional General Artist
Just imagine the diversity, very interesting.
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:iconfingertier:
Fingertier Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2012
Cretaceos Yapok!
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2012  Professional General Artist
well, crossed with a tasmanian devil, I think.
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Student General Artist
Is this the creature that ate the T. rex's eggs in Walking with Dinosaurs?
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
yes.
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2012  Student General Artist
Huh. Quite different.
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:iconworld-of-zekira:
world-of-zekira Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012
How cool is that! Ever since I discovered that the Fossa greatly resembles, in skeletal structure and general features anyway, my Ferilon creations, I always love seeing what else our world may have had in it that could have been nudged a little genetically to produce my little fantasy critters. :)


>_> of course, these probably never developed wings or horns. :)
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
Cool, thanks :D
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Very cool!
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
:D
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:iconbubblekirby:
bubblekirby Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012
Welp this discovery screws up my plans for my no kt project... Guess i'll have to use some sort of placental for the canine niches instead
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
cimolestes would be a good candidate, one species of which got pretty big, almost as big as this guy.
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:iconlamnay:
lamnay Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012
Cool, how big was it?
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
about as big as a badger.
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Hobbyist
Great! That's far of the opossum-badger of Walking with Dinosaurs, actually it's a more interesting animal :)
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
I agree, those big crushing teeth it had could only be for crushing things like shellfish, even without finding the skeleton.
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:iconbubblekirby:
bubblekirby Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2013
Were there any marsupials at time that lived like the classic view of Didelphodon?
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2013  Professional General Artist
Well, afew species of Cimolestes got almost as big, so maybe those.
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:iconbubblekirby:
bubblekirby Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2013
What about Deltatheroida?
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2013  Professional General Artist
maybe.
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:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
awesome! =)
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
:D
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:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
=)
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:iconcommander-salamander:
commander-salamander Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
What an interesting creature, and very nice reconstruction.
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
thanks :D
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:iconredpanda7:
RedPanda7 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012
I wonder if that was it's natuaral for colour
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:iconpristichampsus:
Pristichampsus Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012  Professional General Artist
who knows?
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:iconredpanda7:
RedPanda7 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2012
guess it depends on its biome and if they used colours to attract mates
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